Clan Pollock DNA Projects

We all ask questions about who we are and where we came from. As members of Clan Pollock, we have better ideas about how to answer those questions than most Americans. Still, the questions abide.

To that end Clan Pollock has become involved in a number of DNA projects. We'll add to this page in the (hopefully) near future. For now, here's a hodge-podge of information.

After a few years of examining the results, the Pollok and Polk DNA projects hosted by WorldFamilies.net have been merged. The resulting web page is at The Polk-Pollock DNA Project. As of January 2013, 84 people have had their DNA tested for this project! However, we still need more people to join the project as there are many lines in the family and still many unanswered questions. We are looking for contributors from all forms of the name, be it Pollock, Polk, Pogue, or whatever. As the results come in it is ever more apparent that we are all one and the same family, regardless of spelling. Test results are shown at the WorldFamilies Polk/Pollock Project website. DNA samples are very easy to take - it is done by swabbing the inside of the cheek for a saliva sample. You just need to order a kit, take the sample and mail it back to the lab for testing. It usually takes 3-4 weeks to get the results back and put into the database for comparison with other donors. Since we are testing for male line (Y-chromosome) DNA the sample has to come from a male with surname Pollock or associated name.

There are two testing services that we have been using: - FTDNA offers 12, 25, 37 and 67 marker tests which usually cost $109, $129, $169 and $268 respectively but if you join through the Polk/Pollock Project the cost is $99, $124, $149 and $239. There is no charge to join. Just go to http://www.familytreedna.com/DNAList.asp?Group=polk and register. Ancestry.com does 33 and 46 marker tests at a cost of $99 or $149. Go to http://dna.ancestry.com/viewConsole.aspx

From experience we know it is much better to do one of the higher marker number tests. I recommend 33 or 37 as a start. Depending on the results (i.e. if there are some closes matches) an upgrade to 67 might be warranted. Please consider joining the project and contributing a sample, and don't hesitate to contact me at jfpolk@comcast.net for additional information.

We also have a Polk DNA group at Ancestry.com, that has 20+ members. More and more people, including myself, are getting or have been tested, and we have some some surprising results. Results are still pending for some people who were tested, but as an example of a surprise, my own ancestry to the Polks of Mecklenburg is wrong, and I spent more than 22 years on that ancestry, and would have bet money it was correct. People, Polk and Pollock, are sure invited to take a look and might want to see about verifying their own Polk/Pollock ancestry, especially anyone who thinks they are descendants of William Polk/Margaret Taylor of Mecklenburg, Co., NC., and more especially, of John Polk and Eleanor Shelby who d. in 1803 (both of them), York Co., SC. My test (I did two via two different companies) did confirm that I am of the same family line as William Polk/Margaret Taylor (great-grandparents of President James Knox Polk), but way back in Scotland, several hundred years back, but did not confirm the closeness (2nd cousin, 4 generations removed of President Polk) that I believed was proven. Anyone who has any questions, feel free to contact me at billpolk@publicnetworking.org. Bill Polk, Kansas City, MO.

Thanks to our Clan Pollock Historian, John Polk, who has taken on the esponsibility of overseeing the Polk/Pollock DNA group. John writes, I am really glad that we are doing DNA testing and that you got it started in Clan Pollock. The number of participants is growing steadily and we now have a sizeable database currently at 84. I have found it quite useful in answering some long-standing questions and it also shows that Polks, Pollocks, and Pogues, etc. are all "truly one family. I encourage your participation in this project. It can be a very valuable means of verifying your family tree."